This Common Habit Increases Kids’ Risk for Iron Deficiency

Common-Habit-Increases-Kids-Iron-Deficiency

A recent study reinforced something that as a child nutrition dietitian, I’ve known through working with thousands of families over the years in Vancouver, Victoria, and beyond. The study found that giving kids frequent snacks is associated with lower iron levels. In other words, it increases the risk for kids’ iron deficiency.

Why are we concerned about kids’ iron levels? Because iron is necessary for having good energy, overall growth, but perhaps most importantly, it’s necessary for little ones’ growing brains. Without adequate iron, kids won’t live up to their full cognitive capacity.

It’s very, very common for parents to give kids frequent snacks. Families record a food diary when I work with them. In reviewing their food diaries, more often than not, we realize that they’re feeding their kids just about every hour. No wonder the far is full of crumbs and you have food stashed in every purse and jacket pocket!

So how does this habit contribute to kids’ lower iron levels? In two ways:

  1. Snacks usually consist of foods that we deem “snack foods”. They’re things like fruit, granola bars and cookies. These are all low in iron.
  2. Because kids are in the habit of snacking all day long, they don’t have an appetite to eat at lunch and dinner – the times when iron-rich foods are usually served.

Now this doesn’t mean that kids only need to eat 3 meals a day. They have big energy needs (to keep those busy bodies moving and growing), small tummies, and short attention spans. So it’s unlikely that kids will meet their nutrition needs by eating just 3 meals a day. I recommend that kids be offered opportunities to eat 5-6 times a day. There is no one pattern that families have to follow. But a common pattern that achieves this is:

  • Breakfast
  • Morning snack
  • Lunch
  • Afternoon snack
  • Dinner
  • Bedtime snack

To avoid constant snacking, look ahead at your family’s schedule. Plan for when you’ll offer these 5 – 6 opportunities to eat. Plan for the opportunities to eat to be at least 1 hour apart from each other so that your child has a chance to digest what they’ve just eaten and build an appetite again. Aim to have your meals and snacks at about the same times each day.

For healthy snack ideas for kids, click here to get your copy of 101 Snack Ideas: (Real Food That Even Picky Kids Will Eat)

Posted in Kids' Snacks, Meals for Kids, Parenting, Picky Eating, Preschooler (3 - 5 years), Toddler (1 - 3 years) Tagged with:
3 comments on “This Common Habit Increases Kids’ Risk for Iron Deficiency
  1. Chantal Morais says:

    Hi Kristen, do you have a link to the study?

    • Kristen Yarker says:

      Chantal I’m having trouble putting my fingers back on it (I’m always reading new studies here and there). I’ll share it when I find it again.
      Kristen

  2. 3r Global says:

    I’m so excited to try this. hope my son likes it. Thank you for the post.

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